Why were the Portuguese interested in Africa?

Portuguese expansion into Africa began with the desire of King John I to gain access to the gold-producing areas of West Africa. … In this way, the Portuguese diverted the trade in gold and slaves away from the trans-Saharan routes causing their decline and increased their own status as a powerful trading nation.

What did the Portuguese hope to acquire in Africa?

why did Portugal begin exploration of the west coast of Africa? Portuguese wanted to find their own Gold markets at a cheaper price to sell at a higher price. As trade with the East increased Portugal needed more gold to pay off their debts.

When did the Portuguese go to Africa?

The most momentous discovery in western Africa, however, came in 1471, when Portuguese captains first reached the coast of modern Ghana between the mouths of the Ankobra and Volta rivers.

Why did Portugal need African slaves?

The high demand for slaves was due to a shortage of laborers in Portugal. Black slaves were in higher demand than Moorish slaves because they were much easier to convert to Christianity and less likely to escape.

What did the Portuguese trade with West Africa?

They traded gold, and also spices, ivory, and slaves for metals, cloth, and manufactured goods. Some people in Mali were farmers, who grew beans, squash, melons, and lemons.

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What were the Portuguese colonies in Africa?

By the late eighteenth century, the Portuguese had managed to retain in Africa only the small colonies of Cape Verde, Guinea-Bissau, and São Tomé and Princípe in West Africa and the much more extensive but largely undeveloped colonies of Angola and Mozambique in southern Africa.

How many countries did Portugal colonize?

Portugal’s empire, which survived for more than six centuries, was the first of the great European global empires and outlasted all others as well, surviving until 1999. Its former possessions are now across 50 countries around the world.

Who sold African slaves to the Portuguese?

Benin’s conflict over slavery is particularly intense. For over 200 years, powerful kings in what is now the country of Benin captured and sold slaves to Portuguese, French and British merchants.

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